posts tagged "books I've read"

24. Something Rotten - Jasper Fforde
Four books down and if anything this series just gets better. I thought it impossible, but as the book reached its close, I spent the last two chapters just in awe of Fforde’s mastery of the plot and how everything came together, stretching back to elements from the first book. IT’S SO GOOD I CAN’T. I JUST CAN’T. MUST READ MORE.
Favourite quotation - ”Hamlet snorted disdainfully, then thought for a moment before adding: ‘If the real world were a book, it would never find a publisher. Over-long, detailed to the point of distraction - and ultimately without a major resolution.’
'Perhaps,' I said thoughtfully, 'that's exactly what we like about it.'

24. Something Rotten - Jasper Fforde

Four books down and if anything this series just gets better. I thought it impossible, but as the book reached its close, I spent the last two chapters just in awe of Fforde’s mastery of the plot and how everything came together, stretching back to elements from the first book. IT’S SO GOOD I CAN’T. I JUST CAN’T. MUST READ MORE.

Favourite quotation - ”Hamlet snorted disdainfully, then thought for a moment before adding: ‘If the real world were a book, it would never find a publisher. Over-long, detailed to the point of distraction - and ultimately without a major resolution.’

'Perhaps,' I said thoughtfully, 'that's exactly what we like about it.'

23. The Name of the Star - Maureen Johnson
For only £1, this book was fantastic. At times it seemed a lot like a book I’d been thinking of, about ghosts and whatnot, but overall it was far better than anything I could’ve written, and worth more than just a pound!
Favourite quotation - ”Sometimes you had to see the bathroom to know the hard reality of things.”

23. The Name of the Star - Maureen Johnson

For only £1, this book was fantastic. At times it seemed a lot like a book I’d been thinking of, about ghosts and whatnot, but overall it was far better than anything I could’ve written, and worth more than just a pound!

Favourite quotation - ”Sometimes you had to see the bathroom to know the hard reality of things.”

22. Lost in a Good Book - Jasper Fforde
Woops, this is out of order - but I suppose good ol’ Colonel Next wouldn’t mind. Yet again, this series continues to be fantastic beyond description, though I suppose I ought to try. In LiaGB, Thursday’s husband has been killed before he had even turned 3, she now works for the police inside books, Jurisfiction, and the world is set to hit Armageddon by every bit of organic matter turning into pink goo before long. All this and it’s cleverly written, full of wit and clever ideas and I just want to marry this book series.
Favourite quotation - "It didn’t look as if the world was about to end in twenty-six minutes, but then I don’t suppose it ever does."

22. Lost in a Good Book - Jasper Fforde

Woops, this is out of order - but I suppose good ol’ Colonel Next wouldn’t mind. Yet again, this series continues to be fantastic beyond description, though I suppose I ought to try. In LiaGB, Thursday’s husband has been killed before he had even turned 3, she now works for the police inside books, Jurisfiction, and the world is set to hit Armageddon by every bit of organic matter turning into pink goo before long. All this and it’s cleverly written, full of wit and clever ideas and I just want to marry this book series.

Favourite quotation - "It didn’t look as if the world was about to end in twenty-six minutes, but then I don’t suppose it ever does."

21. The Well of Lost Plots - Jasper Fforde
I fell in love with this series not as one falls asleep, as John Green would wish, but as one feels the pain of stepping on an upturned plug - instantly. This series is just wonderful, and Thursday’s transition into the world of fiction is as masterfully written as the rest. So many beautiful and clever moments that play with writing itself. Everyone should read this series. Everyone.
Favourite quotation - "It was the Suddenly a Shot Rang Out plot device Snell had given me… the small glass globe fell to the floor and shattered as they looked on helplessly. Suddenly, a shot rang out. I didn’t see where it came from but felt its full effect; the bullet hit the chain that was holding me to the anvils, shattering it neatly.”

21. The Well of Lost Plots - Jasper Fforde

I fell in love with this series not as one falls asleep, as John Green would wish, but as one feels the pain of stepping on an upturned plug - instantly. This series is just wonderful, and Thursday’s transition into the world of fiction is as masterfully written as the rest. So many beautiful and clever moments that play with writing itself. Everyone should read this series. Everyone.

Favourite quotation"It was the Suddenly a Shot Rang Out plot device Snell had given me… the small glass globe fell to the floor and shattered as they looked on helplessly. Suddenly, a shot rang out. I didn’t see where it came from but felt its full effect; the bullet hit the chain that was holding me to the anvils, shattering it neatly.”

20 (Because I forgot Chaos Walking was three books). The Graveyard Book - Neil Gaiman
What a wonderful book. Chronicling the childhood of Nobody, adopted by the long-dead Owens family and rasied in a graveyard, this book is a series of charming miniature adventures wrapped up in a greater story that spans the whole book. From the witch to the Macabray, the whole book was wonderfully endearing, but also left me thinking at times - especially the pensive ending, which I shan’t spoiler.
Favourite quotation - "A graveyard is not normally a democracy, and yet death is the great democracy."

20 (Because I forgot Chaos Walking was three books). The Graveyard Book - Neil Gaiman

What a wonderful book. Chronicling the childhood of Nobody, adopted by the long-dead Owens family and rasied in a graveyard, this book is a series of charming miniature adventures wrapped up in a greater story that spans the whole book. From the witch to the Macabray, the whole book was wonderfully endearing, but also left me thinking at times - especially the pensive ending, which I shan’t spoiler.

Favourite quotation"A graveyard is not normally a democracy, and yet death is the great democracy."

17. The Eyre Affair - Jasper Fforde
I shall have read the rest of this series as soon as possible, for it is amazing. Fforde writes in a similar style to Douglas Adams, but this series is amazing because it plays with writing, text, and fiction in completely fantastic and fantastical ways. I hesitantly put this forward as my new favourite book series, and implore everyone to read it. Thanks to Amy for recommending it, and to another Amy for spurring me on :P
Favourite quotation (paraphrased) - ”Growth for its own sake is the philosophy of cancer.”

17. The Eyre Affair - Jasper Fforde

I shall have read the rest of this series as soon as possible, for it is amazing. Fforde writes in a similar style to Douglas Adams, but this series is amazing because it plays with writing, text, and fiction in completely fantastic and fantastical ways. I hesitantly put this forward as my new favourite book series, and implore everyone to read it. Thanks to Amy for recommending it, and to another Amy for spurring me on :P

Favourite quotation (paraphrased) - ”Growth for its own sake is the philosophy of cancer.”

16. The Hobbit - J.R.R.Tolkein
Quite frankly, I think it’s an achievement to not have read this book until now, seeing as Tolkein is an ex-pupil of my school and it gets thrust on us daily. Quite right too; this book was fantastic. I loved the style of it, and the characters were all wonderful. I cannot wait for the film, though I must, when I get to see the fantasy version of me, Bilbo when he’s at home, turn into the great adventurer I probably’ll never be.
Favourite quotation - Alas, a library book from which I did not note a quotation.

16. The Hobbit - J.R.R.Tolkein

Quite frankly, I think it’s an achievement to not have read this book until now, seeing as Tolkein is an ex-pupil of my school and it gets thrust on us daily. Quite right too; this book was fantastic. I loved the style of it, and the characters were all wonderful. I cannot wait for the film, though I must, when I get to see the fantasy version of me, Bilbo when he’s at home, turn into the great adventurer I probably’ll never be.

Favourite quotation - Alas, a library book from which I did not note a quotation.

15. The Logic Manual - Volker Halbach
I was lent this book after a talk on the propositional logic form of knowledge given by an old pupil of my school now studying Maths and Philosophy at Oxford. This was one of his course books, and it totally confirmed that I’m going to like my course. I found all the logic in it interesting, and recommend it to anyone who thinks they might be interested in this sort of thing. I’m not going to pretend I understood it all, but what I did understand I found fascinating, and can’t wait to be studying it proper come October.
Favourite quotation - ”The relation of loving contains exactly those ordered pairs |d,e| such that d loves e. This relation is presumably not reflexive on the set of all persons: some people do not love themselves. Much grief is caused by the fact that this relation is not symmetric, and the fortunate cases of mutual love show that the relation is also not symmetric or asymmetric.”

15. The Logic Manual - Volker Halbach

I was lent this book after a talk on the propositional logic form of knowledge given by an old pupil of my school now studying Maths and Philosophy at Oxford. This was one of his course books, and it totally confirmed that I’m going to like my course. I found all the logic in it interesting, and recommend it to anyone who thinks they might be interested in this sort of thing. I’m not going to pretend I understood it all, but what I did understand I found fascinating, and can’t wait to be studying it proper come October.

Favourite quotation - ”The relation of loving contains exactly those ordered pairs |d,e| such that d loves e. This relation is presumably not reflexive on the set of all persons: some people do not love themselves. Much grief is caused by the fact that this relation is not symmetric, and the fortunate cases of mutual love show that the relation is also not symmetric or asymmetric.”

14. Regeneration - Pat Barker
I really liked this. It’s a book about treating shellshock post WWI, featuring patients such as Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen, being treated by W.H.R.Rivers (whom I mentioned in an essay and was thus recommended this book). There are lots of powerful moments about dealing with the horrors of war, but I’m still undecided about reading the sequels - some of the stuff that they dealt with was gruesome enough for one book… At any rate, Regeneration was powerful and at times emotional, and well worth a read.
Favourite quotation - I forgot to note one down before I returned it to the library!

14. Regeneration - Pat Barker

I really liked this. It’s a book about treating shellshock post WWI, featuring patients such as Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen, being treated by W.H.R.Rivers (whom I mentioned in an essay and was thus recommended this book). There are lots of powerful moments about dealing with the horrors of war, but I’m still undecided about reading the sequels - some of the stuff that they dealt with was gruesome enough for one book… At any rate, Regeneration was powerful and at times emotional, and well worth a read.

Favourite quotation - I forgot to note one down before I returned it to the library!

13. The Goddess Test  - Aimée Carter
I like this sort of book as a form of escapism - young kid, hard life, finds supernatural power, etc., etc.. There’s nothing unique to this book to differentiate it or make it stand out - it’s a bit so what at times and there are some plot twists the main character should really have figured out - but I enjoyed reading it, because it was nice at parts and stuff. Yeah.
Favourite quotation - (because it seems so stupid) "The second thing happened when Ava hit the river. Instead of watching her swim away, I heard a sickening crack as she hit her head on a rock, and the next thing I knew, Ava floated limply as she was carried away by the current.
I winced.”
(I mean come on, you winced?!)

13. The Goddess Test  - Aimée Carter

I like this sort of book as a form of escapism - young kid, hard life, finds supernatural power, etc., etc.. There’s nothing unique to this book to differentiate it or make it stand out - it’s a bit so what at times and there are some plot twists the main character should really have figured out - but I enjoyed reading it, because it was nice at parts and stuff. Yeah.

Favourite quotation - (because it seems so stupid) "The second thing happened when Ava hit the river. Instead of watching her swim away, I heard a sickening crack as she hit her head on a rock, and the next thing I knew, Ava floated limply as she was carried away by the current.

I winced.”

(I mean come on, you winced?!)

The Knife of Never Letting Go, The Ask and The Answer, Monsters of Men (The Chaos Walking series) - Patrick Ness
Oh wow. This book series was amazing, I could barely put it down and burned through it in about a week. The premise is simple - what if everyone could read everyone else’s thoughts - but the directions it takes, the ideas it explores, the stories it tells - the characters it creates, man, the characters - are fantastic. The writing style is unique, with typography being played with as well as some quirky patois, but it works, it makes the story a lot more believable and fantastic and I don’t know why you’re reading this when you could be reading these books.
Favourite quotation [Unfortunately, as I borrowed the latter two in the series from the library, I have only the first to check for bookmarked quotations] - "Without a filter, a man is just chaos walking."

The Knife of Never Letting Go, The Ask and The Answer, Monsters of Men (The Chaos Walking series) - Patrick Ness

Oh wow. This book series was amazing, I could barely put it down and burned through it in about a week. The premise is simple - what if everyone could read everyone else’s thoughts - but the directions it takes, the ideas it explores, the stories it tells - the characters it creates, man, the characters - are fantastic. The writing style is unique, with typography being played with as well as some quirky patois, but it works, it makes the story a lot more believable and fantastic and I don’t know why you’re reading this when you could be reading these books.

Favourite quotation [Unfortunately, as I borrowed the latter two in the series from the library, I have only the first to check for bookmarked quotations] - "Without a filter, a man is just chaos walking."

The Etymologicon - Mark Forsyth
If you were looking to get into my pants, finding etymologies interesting would basically make me drop ‘em there and there. I love etymologies, love ‘em to bits, and think this book, which paves a circular path from one word to the next, the etymology of one word linking to another throughout the book, and boy, is it lovely. From the frequentative suffix (something that sparkles sparks often, something that waddles wades often) to why we call turkeys turkeys whereas the French call ‘em dinde (d’Inde - of India), it’s fantastic on every page.
Favourite quotation - "Crap is a sticky subject. Luckily I have, as it were, immersed myself in it."

The Etymologicon - Mark Forsyth

If you were looking to get into my pants, finding etymologies interesting would basically make me drop ‘em there and there. I love etymologies, love ‘em to bits, and think this book, which paves a circular path from one word to the next, the etymology of one word linking to another throughout the book, and boy, is it lovely. From the frequentative suffix (something that sparkles sparks often, something that waddles wades often) to why we call turkeys turkeys whereas the French call ‘em dinde (d’Inde - of India), it’s fantastic on every page.

Favourite quotation - "Crap is a sticky subject. Luckily I have, as it were, immersed myself in it."

The Templar’s Quest - C.M.Palov
Capitalising on the pulp fiction success of The Da Vinci code, I absolutely loved this book, but it was kind of rubbish. The plot was something about the Vril force needing the Holy Grail to be incorporated into the special lay line made by several monuments in france that’d been built by the illuminati, the knights templar, and hitler, in order to sent a message back in time to make sure that the Third Reich succeeded by invading the oil-rich middle east instead of Russia. That is true. But I loved how unintentionally funny it was. I mean, with phrases like "Finn wanted that gun in the worst awful way" and any adjective of size or weight being suffixed by ‘ass’ (heavy-ass, big-ass, huge-ass…), I loved it, and I think I want it in the ‘worst awful way’. So good.
Favourite quotation - ""I didn’t know Frenchman could play golf", Finn snickered, "And the thought that he was going to have his nails done ahead of time is more than this beer-swigging soldier can handle. Pass me the Freedom Fries on the double quick""
(Where can I find me some Freedom Fries?)

The Templar’s Quest - C.M.Palov

Capitalising on the pulp fiction success of The Da Vinci code, I absolutely loved this book, but it was kind of rubbish. The plot was something about the Vril force needing the Holy Grail to be incorporated into the special lay line made by several monuments in france that’d been built by the illuminati, the knights templar, and hitler, in order to sent a message back in time to make sure that the Third Reich succeeded by invading the oil-rich middle east instead of Russia. That is true. But I loved how unintentionally funny it was. I mean, with phrases like "Finn wanted that gun in the worst awful way" and any adjective of size or weight being suffixed by ‘ass’ (heavy-ass, big-ass, huge-ass…), I loved it, and I think I want it in the ‘worst awful way’. So good.

Favourite quotation - ""I didn’t know Frenchman could play golf", Finn snickered, "And the thought that he was going to have his nails done ahead of time is more than this beer-swigging soldier can handle. Pass me the Freedom Fries on the double quick""

(Where can I find me some Freedom Fries?)

Planet Word - J. P. Davidson

Words, words, words. I missed the TV series of the same name, but the book was a wonderful whirlwind of whimsy and wisdom, ranging from the ancient to the modern, the everyday to the amazing. I truly love language, and this book expresses some of that love; the description of libraries, of opening a new book, of listening to different accents, it’s all just lovely.

Favourite quotation - "There’s a story about the Australian media mogul Rupert Murdoch, who was at a dinner party with a self-regarding broadsheet editor. The English editor announced to his fellow diners: "I’ve met six British prime ministers, four French presidents, four American presidents and three popes, and, do you know, not one of them struck me as having a first-class mind." There was a pause around the dinner table, and then Murdoch said, "Did it ever occur to you that they probably thought you were a bit of a dick too?""

The Fault in our Stars - John Green 

This is a great book. The story is powerful, the characters real - although it at one point waxes lyrical about what happens to characters after a book ends - and overall, it manages to portray such a daunting, overwhelming, and terrifying situation (to the characters involved and from an author’s perspective) without pretentiousness and with great humanity. I don’t want to put any spoilers, but suffice to say, it is a book that will stick with me for a while.

Oh, and I got a Hanklerfish too!

Favourite quotation - "the problem is not suffering itself or oblivion itself but the depraved meaninglessness of these things, the absolutely inhuman nihilism of suffering…what we want is to be noticed by the universe, to have the universe give a shit what happens to us - not the collective idea of sentient life, but each of us, as individuals."